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. well, by the time you get involved in that, everybody's sweating and pouring on the energy and slowing down. they're no longer where they were when they came into the room. it's a different place, and i think it's magic. ♪ on my way. (narrator) the power of music itself can be the force that draws people together. ♪ i would like to reach out my hand. ♪ at rock and roll concerts world-wide, musical performance often facilitates the creation of community. large concerts such as those by the pittsburgh-based band rusted root are highly interactive and transformative events that bring participants together in ways that often transcend the performance itself. ♪ send me on my way. ♪ on my way. ♪ send me on my way. (man) i think the question of what is powerful about music or musical experience is very interesting, because i think it goes beyond the scales that are being performed or the particular rhythms or even necessarily the execution of it. i think that the environment that's created between the band and the audience provides some sort of emotional venue in which many magica
-- loss of energy, difficulty functioning on the job, feeling like you can't cope at home, feeling like you just want to withdraw and do nothing. i would go inside myself and feel inside myself, and not talk, not want to watch tv, not want to do anything, and then eventually, i'd go to a sleeping mode; i'd want to sleep a lot. you can't just say to yourself, "snap out of it and get back on your feet." some people with depression can force themselves to get out of bed, but they can't force themselves to enjoy life. they can't force themselves to concentrate. there are actual changes in neurochemistry in the brain, there are changes in hormones in the body. there are actual physical, biological factors that prevent the depressed patient from being themselves. that can be hard to convince people of. there is a tremendous stigma against mental illness in general, and depression in partular, in this society. ...and i kind of go into a shell when i'm having an episode, because i don't want to hear that it's nothing, and that i can just, you know, pull up on my boot straps and move on, because
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harnessing all other kinds of energy. during that long block of time from a couple of million years ago until the industrial revolution, there was a point about 10,000 years ago when human beings began to farm, began to practice agriculture, and that harnessed a lot more energy than was possible by just hunting and gathering wild resources. keach: in the old world, we know that agriculture sparked the development of the world's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c.
not only my health but my energy. this i intend to restore and i am off to panama to live like a savage. narrator: still looking for paradise, gauguin arrived in panama in 1887 with charles laval, a younger artist. work had begun on the canal which would open the floodgates to another wave of colonial adventure. gauguin found work with a construction firm. after two weeks and bouts of malaria and dysentery, the painters made off for martinique and found a new storehouse of ideas. reader (gauguin): we have found a native hut oa plantation. below us, the sea and a sandy beach for bathing and on either side coconut palms and other fruit trees for a landscape painter to feast on... what appeals to me most is the people, and every day brings a ceaseless coming and going of island women in colorful fad finery with their infinite variety of graceful movements. narrator: gauguin returned to paris late in 1887 and sold some of his martinique paintings. the perceptive critic octave mirbeau was spellbound. ra sacred, eden-like abundance in these forest interiorstery, with their monstrous vegetatio
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5